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August 22, 2017
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Alexander Freed's Blog   Expert Blogs

 

Alexander Freed is a narrative designer, comic book scripter, and New York Times bestselling novelist with over a decade of game writing experience. He began his video game career at BioWare, where he served as Lead Writer on multiple projects before departing to focus on freelancing. Since then, he has continued to work on such BioWare franchises as Star Wars: The Old Republic, Mass Effect, and Dragon Age, as well as writing and consulting for Kabam, Obsidian Entertainment, Stoic, WB Games Montreal, and other companies on projects ranging from indie to AAA to mobile. Reach him on Twitter at @AlexanderMFreed or see www.alexanderfreed.com for more information.

 

Expert Blogs

Posted by Alexander Freed on Tue, 21 Feb 2017 08:52:00 EST in Design, Console/PC, Indie, Smartphone/Tablet
Let's go back to basics in a quick discussion on narrative, cutscenes, and viewpoint changes. What are the downsides of the old "Meanwhile..." trick in a video game story, and how do you mitigate them?


Posted by Alexander Freed on Mon, 08 Aug 2016 11:37:00 EDT in Design, Console/PC, Indie, Smartphone/Tablet
Romance subplots are tough to write even in traditional media. What special challenges do writers face bringing them into the interactive sphere? In this post, we look at romance in branching games and how to deal with player choices and expectations.


Posted by Alexander Freed on Mon, 25 Jul 2016 11:16:00 EDT in Design, Console/PC, Indie, Smartphone/Tablet
Romance subplots are tough to write even in traditional media. What special challenges do writers face bringing them into the interactive sphere? In this post, we look specifically at romances in non-branching games and how best to deploy them.


Posted by Alexander Freed on Mon, 29 Jun 2015 01:49:00 EDT in Design, Console/PC, Indie, Smartphone/Tablet
Novelists can't get data on how long it takes someone to read a given chapter or whether anyone finishes their books. You can do much better than that. Shore up your game narrative with the magic of data!


Posted by Alexander Freed on Mon, 15 Jun 2015 05:44:00 EDT in Design, Console/PC, Indie, Smartphone/Tablet
Why do games keep returning to the same tired Tolkien-derivative fantasies and space marine stories? It's not simply a lack of creativity--there are unique challenges to exploring new ideas in interactive narrative, which we'll discuss ways to overcome.


Posted by Alexander Freed on Mon, 04 May 2015 01:51:00 EDT in Design, Console/PC, Smartphone/Tablet
If youíre working on an overall story document for your teamís game and youíre not sure how to approach it, hereís some advice...



Alexander Freed's Comments

Comment In: [Blog - 07/25/2016 - 11:16]

Just alternating pronouns for player ...

Just alternating pronouns for player / player character. Nothing more meaningful than that.

Comment In: [Blog - 06/29/2015 - 01:49]

I 'd be cautious about ...

I 'd be cautious about collecting data in the way you suggest--in a narrative-focused game which most games with branching choices will be , you 're just as likely to get the player 's in character response rather than the actual reason. r n r nWhen it comes to getting ...

Comment In: [Blog - 06/15/2015 - 05:44]

That 's a good point--it ...

That 's a good point--it 's very easy for placeholder ideas to become set in stone through inertia. There are still plenty of interesting things you can do with a shooter, but if all the prototypes are built with an assumption of space marine, that assumption will creep into the ...

Comment In: [Blog - 05/04/2015 - 01:51]

Hey, Evan r n r ...

Hey, Evan r n r nYeah, ABSOLUTELY, and thank you for bringing that up. Just as a plot summary doc can 't replace a story pitch doc for executives or licensors, it also isn 't that useful to bring a large team in sync with the overall narrative direction. Get ...

Comment In: [Blog - 10/01/2014 - 01:45]

Glad you enjoyed the series ...

Glad you enjoyed the series I think profiling the Player character, as you describe, could work great for some games... and I think one of the benefits of handling it through dialogue is that the profile doesn 't need to be ACCURATE--it just needs to be accurate in regards to ...

Comment In: [Blog - 09/24/2014 - 03:01]

Absolutely. That 's a great ...

Absolutely. That 's a great example subjective, of course, but this is all about subjective Player experience of both a not caring and b the need to cater to multiple archetypes, and how those two categories overlap. r n r nYou, the Player, weren 't interested in hearing about the ...